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Office Hours 2: Soil Hydraulic Properties

Learn soil hydraulic conductivity measurement methods, best practices, applications, and more in this live Q&A session with our science and product experts.

Hydraulic conductivity is critical to understanding the complete water balance

Hydraulic conductivity impacts almost every soil application: crop production, irrigation, drainage, hydrology in both urban and native lands, landfill performance, stormwater system design, aquifer recharge, runoff during flooding, soil erosion, climate models, and even soil health. In this live Q&A session, METER research scientists, Dr. Colin Campbell and Leo Rivera answer questions about understanding water movement through soil. 

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Presenters

Dr. Colin Campbell has been a research scientist at METER for 20 years following his PH.D. at Texas A&M University in Soil Physics. He is currently serving as Vice President of METER Environment. He is also adjunct faculty with the Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences at Washington State University, where he co-teaches Environmental Biophysics, a class he took over from his father, Gaylon, nearly 20 years ago. Dr. Campbell’s early research focused on field-scale measurements of CO2 and water vapor flux but has shifted toward moisture and heat flow instrumentation for the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum

Leo Rivera operates as a research scientist and Hydrology Product Manager at METER Group, the world leader in soil moisture measurement. He earned his undergraduate degree in Agriculture Systems Management at Texas A&M University, where he also got his Master’s degree in Soil Science. There he helped develop an infiltration system for measuring hydraulic conductivity used by the NRCS in Texas. Currently, Leo is the force behind application development in METER’s hydrology instrumentation including HYPROP and WP4C. He also works in R&D to explore new instrumentation for water and nutrient movement in soil.

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Our scientists have decades of experience helping researchers and growers measure the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.