®
Request a quote
Request a quote

Water Management: 3 Tools You Might Be Missing

undefined

Dr. Colin Campbell explores the latest water management research and real world examples to answer the questions: Does water management work? What are challenges and best practices? And what should we do next?

Why overwatering is causing you problems

Just like a thermostat can be set optimally for comfort without wasting heat, the latest advances in sensor technology can do the same for plants: keep them comfortable, without wasting water. This means you can have higher quality and yield while reducing problems caused by overwatering such as disease or the need to reapply expensive nutrients that have been flushed away. If you want to understand the impact you’re having on the environment while at the same time producing better plants, you’ll need to measure the variables that drive those things. Water is inherently knowable. And if we can know it, we can manage it effectively. 

Better management—better plant performance

Join Dr. Colin Campbell as he explores the latest water management research and real world examples to answer the questions: Does water management work? What are challenges and best practices? And what should we do next? Discover:

  • The role water plays in managed ecosystems 
  • How using measurement technology like soil water potential, soil water content, electrical conductivity, and temperature can show impacts of management
  • How to deploy these sensors effectively in high-dollar ecosystems
  • What the interplay is between environmental variables like evapotranspiration and soil water
  • How combining these variables can inform water management
  • How overwatering impacts disease and critical nutrients in the root zone

Unlock the webinar

Please enter your info to see the recording. If you have previously registered for this event, log in below.

Dr. Colin Campbell has been a research scientist at METER for 20 years following his Ph.D. at Texas A&M University in Soil Physics. He is currently serving as Vice President of METER Environment. He is also adjunct faculty with the Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences at Washington State University where he co-teaches Environmental Biophysics, a class he took over from his father, Gaylon, nearly 20 years ago. Dr. Campbell’s early research focused on field-scale measurements of CO2 and water vapor flux but has shifted toward moisture and heat flow instrumentation for the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.

 

Next steps

Questions?

Our scientists have decades of experience helping researchers and growers measure the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. 

Case studies, webinars, and articles you’ll love

Receive the latest content on a regular basis.