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Soil Sensors in Cadavers and Other Ideas to Expand the Uniqueness of Your Research
Webinar - December 15, 2020

Soil Sensors in Cadavers and Other Ideas to Expand the Uniqueness of Your Research

Ideas from the bleeding edge

Ever notice how some scientists attract attention—and how they always get funded? That’s because they’re always doing something interesting. We’ve seen people do some crazy and novel things with our instruments. Sometimes they work, sometimes they don’t. But usually, the visionary researchers who think of these novel ideas are the ones that get noticed.

New trends in data collection and data use you should consider

In this 20-minute webinar, application experts, Dr. Doug Cobos, Leo Rivera, and Chris Chambers share the best novel research ideas they’ve seen over the years to help you think outside the box, rise above the crowd, and stand out in a sea of proposals. Discover:

  • The most inventive ways people have used our instrumentation in their research
  • What to consider before using a sensor in a novel way
  • Research trends we’ve seen and our predictions about future trends based on years of reviewing fellowship applications

 

Next steps

Presenters

Dr. Doug Cobos is a Research Scientist and the Director of Research and Development at METER. He also holds an adjunct appointment in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at Washington State University where he co-teaches Environmental Biophysics. Doug’s Master’s Degree from Texas A&M and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota focused on field-scale fluxes of CO2 and mercury, respectively. Doug was hired at METER to be the Lead Engineer in charge of designing the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) that flew to Mars aboard NASA’s 2008 Phoenix Scout Lander. His current research is centered on instrumentation development for soil and plant sciences.

Leo Rivera operates as a research scientist and Hydrology Product Manager at METER Group, the world leader in soil moisture measurement. He earned his undergraduate degree in Agriculture Systems Management at Texas A&M University, where he also got his Master’s degree in Soil Science. There he helped develop an infiltration system for measuring hydraulic conductivity used by the NRCS in Texas. Currently, Leo is the force behind application development in METER’s hydrology instrumentation including HYPROP and WP4C. He also works in R&D to explore new instrumentation for water and nutrient movement in soil.

Chris Chambers operates as the Environment Support Manager and the Soil Moisture Sensor Product Manager at METER Group, the world leader in soil moisture measurement. He specializes in ecology and plant physiology and has over 10 years of experience helping researchers measure the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.