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Simplify Your Data Collection Workflow
Webinar - March 20, 2018

Simplify Your Data Collection Workflow

What’s your time worth?

Misplaced data loggers, dead batteries, and the resulting field visits take time away from actual data analysis. And it doesn’t help when data must be manually downloaded or researchers are forced to commute to and from field sites for specialized cables. The question is simple. Would you rather spend time analyzing data or spend time collecting it? 

Cut your data collection time in half

Dr. Colin Campbell discusses how the EM60G’s new on-board technology such as GPS location, barometric pressure, and integrated solar panel reduce data collection workflow time to a minimum, eliminate inefficient processes, and provide researchers the critical time they need to focus on their data. In this 20-minute coffee break webinar, he will address the following questions:

  • What is the future of data collection?
  • How can scientists avoid typical field research pain points?
  • What do developments to the EM60G mean for researchers?

View the presentation slides here.

About the Speaker

Dr. Colin Campbell is a senior research scientist with METER Group and serves as the Vice President of Environment. He is also an adjunct professor with the Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences at Washington State University where he teaches a class in environmental biophysics. Following his PhD. in Soil Physics at Texas A&M University, where he studied field scale carbon flux, Dr. Campbell has spent the last 18 years developing sensors and instruments to make measurements in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. One of the highlights of his career was working together with METER colleagues to design and build the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe that measured multiple parameters including soil moisture and thermal properties on the surface of Mars as a part of NASA’s 2007 Phoenix Mission. His latest work has been focused on developing in situ moisture release curves and perfecting a new all-in-one mini-weather station