LABROS

Soil laboratory measurements of the future

Automate your workflow.

 

PARIO

Conventional particle-size analysis operation takes a lot of time and energy. And because the procedure is manual, it’s prone to errors—which can easily lead to wasted time and effort.

The PARIO theory

The integral suspension pressure method (ISP) for precise particle-size analysis by gravitational sedimentation.

 

SATURATED HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY IN THE LAB

The KSAT is the only automated setup for taking saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements in the lab. In its simplest form, it’s an instrument that uses both the falling and constant head methods on a soil core. Best of all, it’s completely integrated, so you’re also assured of software-controlled engineering that’s fully tested.

HYPROP® 2 IMPROVED

As soil scientists who have made hundreds of moisture release curves, we wanted an instrument that delivered greater accuracy. And we demanded an instrument that was automated.

RELATIVE HUMIDITY IN SOIL

Many people assume the soil is dry when it feels dry to the touch. This false assumption can lead to poor decisions such as storing steel drums of toxic waste in a desert soil.

WATER POTENTIAL IN THE LAB

As world experts in water potential and soil suction, it wasn’t enough to engineer an instrument that delivered consistent accuracy.

Moisture release curves in the dry region don't get any easier.

If you want to know something about your soil—how it behaves, how much clay there is, or if there are crystalline structures that may expand when water is present, the VSA is your simplest and most accurate option.

full moisture release curve

Between 0 and -100 kPa, soil loses half or more of its water content.

A comparison of water potential instrument ranges

Water potential is the most fundamental and essential measurement in soil physics because it describes the force that drives water movement. Making good water potential measurements is largely a function of choosing the right instrument and using it skillfully. In an ideal world, there would be one instrument that simply and accurately measured water potential over its entire range from wet to dry.